On Friendship

Reading on Martin Luther this week, I was struck by a passage in which Luther argues that God’s forgiveness in Christ is not just found in sermons preached but ‘in every corner’; more specifically: They not only find the forgiveness of sins in the congregation but also at home in their houses, in the fields […]

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Brief Reading Notes: August 2016 – January 2017

Currently reading: Ian Macfarland, From Nothing; (still reading) Heidegger, Being and Time; Graham Ward, How the Light Gets In. 1, 2, 3. James K.A. Smith, Desiring the Kingdom/ Imagining the Kingdom/Speech and Theology. Helpful to see how insights in phenomenology may aid our articulation of revelation, sanctification and anthropology. Sections of these volumes could, in […]

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On Kampen and Relationships

I had the privilege of being a fellow for the Advanced Theological Studies Fellowship at Kampen Theological University, the Netherlands, this past month. The premise was simple: PhD students with accepted proposals would come together and live under the same roof and research for a month, at the end of which they would present their […]

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Mid-way through: Reflections on Edinburgh

I am now in the middle of my second year in the PhD program at the University of Edinburgh, and it seems appropriate to reflect on my time here thus far. As I write, I am reminded that undertaking this track in my life is a gift, a calling, a privilege, and a blessing. Currently […]

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Theology, Sphere Sovereignty, and the University

In the past several weeks I read on the role of theology in the university – what is its function? Can theology be done in the university? In what way can theology be described as an academic discipline? What is distinctive of academic theology as opposed to ecclesial theology, and should there be a proper […]

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On the Literary Form and Content of Kierkegaard’s Either/Or

Note: The page numbers in brackets refer to Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or: A Fragment of Life, translated and abridged by Alastair Hannay (London: Penguin Books, 1992).   My friend and colleague Nathaniel Gray Sutanto recently wrote an entry on Kierkegaard, a figure much misunderstood in evangelical Reformed circles. I am delighted that Sutanto recognises that “some striking things” Kierkegaard […]

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Faith and Doubt

In the first chapter of the letter from James, he says this about the one who has faith, in contrast to doubt: “But let him ask [for wisdom] in faith, with no doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind. For that person […]

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Ways of Reading and the Bible

There are at least three ways to read. We can read descriptively, prescriptively, or transformatively. Here is what I mean. We can read descriptively. The theologian is trained to codify, compare, and analyze key texts within the Christian tradition for the purposes of conceptual clarity and lucidity in articulation. It trains the reader to think about […]

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To blog or not to blog

It’s been a struggle to start writing on this blog again for the past month. Part of the reason is simply practical; I have presentations to prepare, reviews to write, and a chapter to finish – so my mind is pre-occupied with academic matters. If I write, the post will inevitably be one about Herman […]

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曾劭愷

On My New Title, Karl Barth’s Infralapsarian Theology (IVP Academic, 2016)

During his visit to Taipei last year, Professor Wayne Grudem asked me to summarize my forthcoming IVP Academic title in one sentence. “Barth got Reformed orthodoxy wrong,” I replied. He laughed, of course, because this was obviously meant to be a joke—more or less. Barth’s interpretation of Reformed orthodoxy is at once flawed and deeply inspirational. […]

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