Brief Reading Notes: August 2016 – January 2017

Currently reading: Ian Macfarland, From Nothing; (still reading) Heidegger, Being and Time; Graham Ward, How the Light Gets In. 1, 2, 3. James K.A. Smith, Desiring the Kingdom/ Imagining the Kingdom/Speech and Theology. Helpful to see how insights in phenomenology may aid our articulation of revelation, sanctification and anthropology. Sections of these volumes could, in […]

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Some Reading Notes: 10 (or so) Books.

These books were highlights for me through the past year; some new, some old. Again, I won’t include any Bavinck-related or primary source material. Henry Allison, Kant’s Transcendental Idealism (YUP, 2004) A central book within the so-called ‘third wave’ Kant scholarship (along with Ameriks et al), presenting a ‘non-ontological’ reading of Kant’s transcendental idealism. On […]

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Neo-Calvinism and a “Christian” view of philosophy: A brief survey

John Frame’s History of Western Philosophy was just published a few days ago. It is a large volume worthy of  consideration, as he tells the story of Western philosophy from a Christian perspective. This is acceptable and desirable because, in his view, theology and philosophy are closely intertwined. Both rooted in revelation, Frame argues that “Christian theology […]

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Is Post-Modernism the Villain?

When I was an undergraduate, I took a course in Modern philosophy in which the professor opened up the class by asking the question: most evangelical Christians seem to think that post-modernism is really something to be avoided – but if post-modernism is rejected, was the modernism that it responded to really all that better? […]

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Books I Read (Spring 2015)

I thought it would be useful to write down the books I have read (or am reading) every few months or so – if anything for me to keep a record for myself (and for the guys at home who wonder what I’m doing day to day). I won’t include in these lists any books […]

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Freedom and Joy in Affirming Common Grace

The Neo-Calvinistic doctrine of common grace is of serious importance. It has its roots in a strong biblical theology, and it answers a distinctly Reformed “problem” due to its affirmation of the doctrine of total depravity. How can people who are at root depraved do good – the good that we see non-believers do every […]

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